bar mitzvah, bat mitzvah planning guide
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Bar Mitzvah / Bat Mitzvah and Jewish Wedding Planning and Resource Guide

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The Significance of the Day

The Significance of the Day
B'nai Mitzvah! Guide believes that all families should recognize the religious importance of the Bar/Bat Mitzvah, the rite of passage, and the whole Jewishness of the child. This life-cycle event will have long lasting meaning to the family, relatives, friends and especially the honored child.

Becoming a Bar/Bat Mitzvah symbolizes the child's coming of age and the beginning of life as a fully participating Jewish adult. He/she will now accept religious responsibilities and can perform the important duties of Jewish life.

The celebration of the event is an important component because it honors the child's accomplishments and gives loved ones and others the opportunity to show great pride and joy for the child. This publication focuses on planning the party, but we recommend that you as parents participate fully in the whole Mitzvah and understanding the significance and meaning of the day. Remember, the party would be meaningless without the ceremony. The following is a partial list of resources that helps the reader learn more about the Torah, Judaism, and the spiritual meaning of the Bar/Bat Mitzvah. Your Synagogue, local library, bookstores and the stores in this guide that carry religious items may have these as well as other resources.

What Is A Bar Mitzvah / Bat Mitzvah?
Translated as "Son/daughter of the commandments", one becomes a Bar (boys) or Bat (girls) Mitzvah at age 13 (12 for girls in most Orthodox congregations) independent of a ceremony marking the occasion.

By tradition, because a Bar/Bat Mitzvah ceremony is a custom not a commandment, age 13 is when a child becomes obligated to the ritual responsibilities of Jewish life. This is referred to as the "commandment age", the "age of majority", or a "religious coming of age". At this point in the young adultą¬©fe, he or she is presumed to be responsible for those religious obligations independent of the parents. Those obligations might include mitzvot, being part of a minyan (religious prayer quorum), fasting on Yom Kippur, leading the congregation in prayer or wearing tefillin.Replica Ferrari replica christian louboutin shoes Therefore, becoming a Bar/Bat Mitzvah is certainly an important life-cycle event. In secular terms, this point in a teen's life, often marks enormous growth and maturity reflected by several years of study and practice before the special day. Combined with the responsibility of Jewish adulthood, this event often brings an overwhelming wave of emotion to parents and close relatives.

This event is marked by participation in services and reading the Torah and leading the congregation in prayer. After the service, it is customary to celebrate with a special meal to commemorate the mitzvah. Over time, the celebration party, or simcha, has evolved. This is a way for families to celebrate a rite of passage, as well as bring extended families together from far away to reunite for a joyous celebration.

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